Sinopse

A podcast exploring one graduate student's quest to study for his comprehensive exams in history.

Episódios

  • Tress Seas Ocean Breeze (and Salmon): The History of the Oregon Coast with Joseph E Taylor III

    Tress Seas Ocean Breeze (and Salmon): The History of the Oregon Coast with Joseph E Taylor III

    07/07/2020 Duração: 01h08min

    For show notes, and information on supporting the show, check out our website at historian.live The Nestucca River has been home to salmon and salmon fishers for thousands of years. In this summer-vacation themed episode, I talk with Professor Joseph E Taylor about the 19th and 20th century history of this unique salmon fishery. Combining labor history, environmental history, local history, and a history of recreation, Professor Taylor’s book, Persistent Callings is a deft illustration of how fishing persisted and changed in response to environmental change, changing regulations, and gentrification. All the proceeds from Persistent Callings go to the Pacific City Dorymen’s Association scholarship fund.

  • Brent S. Sirota on Church History and the End of the World

    Brent S. Sirota on Church History and the End of the World

    16/06/2020 Duração: 49min

    In this episode I talk with Professor Brent Sirota about church history in the long 18th century. People have portrayed religion in the long 18th century as a little boring and staid. In the 17th century you had a civil war over religion in Britain. In the 19th century you had evangelicals, Darwin, and the Oxford Movement. But in the 18th century you have almost a cease fire. Professor Sirota's work looks at the process of how that ceasefire came about, and how it was less about religious toleration and more about a political process. In talking about this we end up talking a bit about the end of the world, and why a lot of people in America now think its coming soon. Check out our website at historian.live for book lists, and a link to our Patreon!

  • Immunocapital and Yellow Fever with Prof Kathryn Olivarius (Historians in the Time of COVID 4)

    Immunocapital and Yellow Fever with Prof Kathryn Olivarius (Historians in the Time of COVID 4)

    02/06/2020 Duração: 44min

    In this episode I talk with Stanford Professor Kathryn Olivarius about her research on Yellow Fever in antebellum New Orleans. Yellow Fever was bad. It killed around half of all the people who caught it. Why then did young immigrants to New Orleans seeking to make their fortune sometimes willingly infect themselves with the disease? Olivarius’ research shows that immunity to Yellow Fever became a kind of human capital. People who could demonstrate that they were ‘acclimated’ to Yellow Fever were considered bona fide citizens of the Yellow Fever Zone. Everyone else was just a tourist. If you survived, then it was evidence of your grace—your worthiness in the face of risk—a worthiness that translated to success in the cut-throat world of slave racial capital. It’s a great conversation, one that made me think about the current debate about social distancing and COVID in a brand new way. Thanks to number one listener John Handel for recommending Olivarius’ work to me! Check out Olivarius’ article Immunity, Capit

  • The Time of Monsters With Craig Johnson (Historians in the Time of COVID Episode 3)

    The Time of Monsters With Craig Johnson (Historians in the Time of COVID Episode 3)

    12/05/2020 Duração: 54min

    If you like the show, give us money on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/makingofahistorian In this episode, I sit down with Craig Johnson, “the most returningest” guest in the history of this podcast. I ask him to talk about historical parallels to our current quarantine, and the conversation quickly goes in a direction I didn’t expect. Listen! It’s probably the most political episode we’ve done yet. You can find Craig on Twitter @HistOfTheRight. if you want to hear more from Craig (and you should), listen to his podcast, Fifteen Minutes of Fascism.

  • Historians In The Time of COVID: Three Starts To The USA with Kyle Jackson

    Historians In The Time of COVID: Three Starts To The USA with Kyle Jackson

    06/05/2020 Duração: 45min

    If you like the show can now support us on Patreon! (patreon.com/makingofahistorian) This week we have returning guest Kyle Jackson—who last came on to tell us about the Panama Canal. Today he’s coming on to practice his orals. I ask him to tell us to give us three different dates when we could start the beginning of US history. It’s a great discussion. You’ll learn a lot. Both about US history, and also about how historians think about history. Can’t get enough of Kyle? (We can’t.) In his other life he’s a producer / rapper dubbed Nahvocado. You can find him on his Insta @nahvocado.

  • Historians In The Time Of COVID-19: Decolonization with Varsha Venkatasubramanian

    Historians In The Time Of COVID-19: Decolonization with Varsha Venkatasubramanian

    28/04/2020 Duração: 50min

    We're inaugurating a new podcast interview series during this weird time of isolation with recurring guest, Varsha Venkatasubramanian. Varsha is studying for her comprehensive exams in like TWO WEEKS and she was gracious enough to join us to talk about what it's like to read a thousand books when you don't have library access. We discuss the history of decolonization, which Varsha masterfully guides us from the ideological origins in the American Revolution, through the Haitian Revolution, to Woodrow Wilson's 14 points, to Indian independence. Probably the most educational and fact-dense interview I've ever done!

  • Work And Play 12: Sex

    Work And Play 12: Sex

    20/04/2020 Duração: 36min

    This is the last (or next-to-last!) episode in the series, and we talk about something that can be both work AND play: sex. We look at sex within marriage, masturbation, and prostitution, paying special attention to prostitution as a form of lower-classed labor.

  • Work And Play 11: Sports

    Work And Play 11: Sports

    13/04/2020 Duração: 22min

    Work And Play 11: Sports by Making of a Historian

  • Work And Play 10: Beer

    Work And Play 10: Beer

    06/04/2020 Duração: 37min

    This episode, we talk about beer. Beer isn’t just an enjoyable beverage. You’ll learn: How beer started off as part of a complete breakfast How capitalist brewers destroyed the way of life of the village alewife How IPA became cool for 19th century hipsters And more! Check out show notes at historian.live and we now have a Patreon at patreon.com/makingofahistorian

  • Work And Play 9: Clubs

    Work And Play 9: Clubs

    03/04/2020 Duração: 19min

    In this episode, I talk about clubs, the topic of my dissertation research.

  • Work And Play 8: The Problem of Child Unemployment

    Work And Play 8: The Problem of Child Unemployment

    29/03/2020 Duração: 19min

    Work And Play 8: The Problem of Child Unemployment by Making of a Historian

  • Work And Play 6: Women, Households, Service and Emotional Labor

    Work And Play 6: Women, Households, Service and Emotional Labor

    26/03/2020 Duração: 16min

    In this--another short episode!--we talk about a group of workers who are often written out of the story of the Industrial Revolution. The mostly female ranks of domestic servants, who cleaned houses, made food, educated children, made medicine, and generally made the home a homey place to be. When historians usually deal with servants, they treat them like holdovers of an old regime--their work never really gets mechanized, and they seem to slowly fade away over the 20th century. But I argue here that they are actually precociously modern: they do emotional labor, and so anticipate the modern service industry, where we not only have to WORK, but we have to evoke particular EMOTIONS. We're all servants now.

  • Work And Play 6: Vacations!

    Work And Play 6: Vacations!

    25/03/2020 Duração: 18min

    A tired Brendan talks about the history of vacations, briefly! We discuss how Romantic poets helped make the wilderness beautiful, rather than scary, and about how capitalist entrepreneurs got rich off of a new consumer society devoted to vacationing.

  • Work And Play 5: The Decline Of Work Time

    Work And Play 5: The Decline Of Work Time

    24/03/2020 Duração: 23min

    We're been on a bit of a hiatus in this series. Who knew it'd be hard to juggle teaching, raising a kid, and writing a dissertation? But given the shelter in place of COVID-19, I thought it would be a good time to resume the podcast and try to get through the rest of the episodes in this series. Warning: I'm joined in this podcast by a special guest, my three month old daughter Bina! She has a lot of opinions in the early minutes of this episode, and kinda gets her dad off of his game a little bit. This episode we talk about how in general people in Britain over the second half of the 19th century worked LESS, and how we can use this to understand some of the different ways that historians understand what moves history forward.

  • Work and Play 4: Hands and Minds

    Work and Play 4: Hands and Minds

    11/02/2020 Duração: 25min

    In this episode, we talk sleepily about two parts of labor in the Industrial Revolution that tend not to get a ton of love: craft labor and the professions. We usually think of the image of the factory, but only a very small portion of work was factory work. Many more people worked with their hands. At the same time, there was an expansion in the number of professions. That's it!

  • Work and Play in the Industrial Revolution 3: The Times They Are AChanging

    Work and Play in the Industrial Revolution 3: The Times They Are A'Changing

    05/02/2020 Duração: 26min

    This episode we talk about the history of the experience of time. Yes, even our experience of time itself changed during the Industrial Revolution. The big change we can think of as a change from task-orientation—where we think of our days as devoted to particular things—to time-orientation—where we think of our days as cut up into particular buckets like work-time, play-time and sleep-time. We talk about this change, and how our current experience of time might be changing yet again as new technologies bring work back into the home, and new kinds of surveillance allow for ever greater control of work-time. Check out full show notes at historian.live

  • Work And Play 2: The Industrial Revolution

    Work And Play 2: The Industrial Revolution

    27/01/2020 Duração: 23min

    For the seven-hundreth time, we talk about the Industrial Revolution.

  • Work and Play In The Industrial Revolution 1: Merrie England?

    Work and Play In The Industrial Revolution 1: Merrie England?

    22/01/2020 Duração: 40min

    In this new season, we will be following along with the class I am teaching this semester on Work and Play in the Industrial Revolution. In this episode, we go through the rationale for the course, and we talk about the before part of the story: the popular culture of the long 18th century, filled with drinking, maypoles, and seasonal work. Check out the website at historian.live for images and book-lists!

  • Episode 137: On Friendship, with Professor Joshua Fogel

    Episode 137: On Friendship, with Professor Joshua Fogel

    10/12/2019 Duração: 51min

    For more detailed shownotes, go to our website at historian.live This episode is a co-production with the Journal of History of Ideas Blog’s podcast, In Theory. If you like this show’s format, you’ll love In Theory. Also be sure to check out the JHI Blog itself, which consistently produces some of the best academic writing for a general audience out there. If you dig through the archives, you might even find some of my essays! This episode I’m joined by Joshua Fogel, Professor at York University in Canada to talk about his new book, A Friend In Deed. A Friend In Deed talks about the unlikely friendship between on of 20th Century China’s most important writers, Lu Xun, and a Japanese bookstore maven in Shanghai during the interwar period, Uchiyama Kanzo. It’s a fantastic book that does what few history books can do—it really shows you a rich human relationship. In talking about the book, we discuss Chinese-Japanese relations in the interwar period, the cosmopolitain city of Shanghai, and the nature of frien

  • Episode 136: Neoliberalism and Deindustrialisation with Christopher Lawson

    Episode 136: Neoliberalism and Deindustrialisation with Christopher Lawson

    08/10/2019 Duração: 01h02min

    We're back after an extended break with a great episode. In this episode I walk with my colleague Christopher Lawson about two really big things that happen in the 20th century: deindustrialisation and neoliberalism. These are hard topics to deal with on their own, and Christopher tells the story of how they both interact by telling the story of Scottish steel plants. The big question: should Britain's industry be efficient and globally competitive? or should it build local communities? We talk about so much more! And a programming note: I'm going to try to keep up with the episode a week schedule, but sometime in December, we're going to abruptly stop because our family is expanding! My wife is expecting a kid, due in December, so the podcast will probably go on the back burner at that time.

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